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    (Wikipedia) - Protest For other uses, see Protest (disambiguation). "Remonstration" redirects here. It is not to be confused with Demonstration.Demonstration against the president of Iran Mahmoud Ahmadinejad during the Rio+20 conference in Brazil, June 2012
    This article is in a list format that may be better presented using prose. You can help by converting this article to prose, if appropriate. Editing help is available. (July 2009)
    March on Washington for Jobs and FreedomA working class political protest in Greece calling for the boycott of a bookshop after an employee was fired, allegedly for her political activismAnti-nuclear Power Plant Rally on 19 September 2011 at Meiji Shrine complex in Tokyo. Sixty thousand people marched chanting "Sayonara nuclear power" and waving banners, to call on Japan''s government to abandon nuclear power, following the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

    A protest (also called a remonstrance or a remonstration) is an expression of objection by words or by actions to particular events, policies, or situations. Protests can take many different forms; from individual statements to mass demonstrations. Protesters may organize a protest as a way of publicly making their opinions heard in an attempt to influence public opinion or government policy, or they may undertake direct action in an attempt to directly enact desired changes themselves. Where protests are part of a systematic and peaceful campaign to achieve a particular objective, and involve the use of pressure as well as persuasion, they go beyond mere protest and may be better described as cases of civil resistance or nonviolent resistance.

    Various forms of self-expression and protest are sometimes restricted by governmental policy (such as the requirement of protest permits), economic circumstances, religious orthodoxy, social structures, or media monopoly. When such restrictions occur, protests may assume the form of open civil disobedience, more subtle forms of resistance against the restrictions, or may spill over into other areas such as culture and emigration.

    A protest can itself sometimes be the subject of a counter-protest. In such a case, counter-protesters demonstrate their support for the person, policy, action, etc. that is the subject of the original protest.

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    Historical notionsProtesters against big government fill the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol and the National Mall on September 12, 2009.a prototypical angry mob protesting with the threat of violence

    Unaddressed protests may grow and widen into civil resistance, dissent, activism, riots, insurgency, revolts, and political and/or social revolution. Some examples of protests include:

    Forms of protest See also: Repertoire of contention

    Commonly recognized forms of protest include:

    Public demonstration or political rallyDemonstrators marching outside the 2008 Republican National Convention in Saint Paul, Minnesota.Protest march in Palmerston North, New Zealand.Protesters outside the Oireachtas in Dublin, Republic of Ireland.

    Some forms of direct action listed in this article are also public demonstrations or rallies.

    Written demonstration

    Written evidence of political or economic power, or democratic justification may also be a way of protesting.

    Civil disobedience demonstrations

    Any protest could be civil disobedience if a “ruling authority” says so, but the following are usually civil disobedience demonstrations:

    As a residence Destructive Direct action Protesting a governmentThe District of Columbia issues license plates protesting the "taxation without representation" that occurs due to its special status. Protesting a military shipment By government employeesProtest in Wisconsin State Capitol. Job action Main article: Industrial action In sports

    During a sporting event, under certain circumstances, one side may choose to play a game "under protest", usually when they feel the rules are not being correctly applied. The event continues as normal, and the events causing the protest are reviewed after the fact. If the protest is held to be valid, then the results of the event are changed. Each sport has different rules for protests.

    By management By tenants By consumers Information Civil disobedience to censorship By Internet and social networkingProtesters in Zuccotti Park who are part of Occupy Wall Street using the Internet to get out their message over social networking as events happen, September 2011

    Blogging and social networking have become effective tools to register protest and grievances. Protests can express views, news and use viral networking to reach out to thousands of people.

    Literature, art, culture Protests against religious or ideological institutions Economic effects of protests against companies

    A study of 342 US protests covered by the New York Times newspaper in the period 1962 and 1990 showed that such public activities usually had an impact on the company''s publicly traded stock price. The most intriguing aspect of the study''s findings is that what mattered most was not the number of protest participants, but the amount of media coverage the event received. Stock prices fell an average of one-tenth of a percent for every paragraph printed about the event.

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