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    * Abangan *

    آبانگان


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    Abangan is one of ancient Iranian Festivities celebrated in the month of Aban, the 8th month of Persian Solar Year. The root of the word AB means water in Persian. In Avesta, Aban is an angel called Barzizad «اپم نپات».Aban is the angel, child of waters. He is tall and strong and rides a horse. This angel, Abam Napat is different from Anahita which is a major deity; the mother of waters.Water, Fire, Earth and Air are four essential elements of creation.Abangan Ceremonies generally take place on 10th of original Aban, and 4th Aban in official calendar (Oct, 25) to honor Anahita, the Persian deity of flowing waters. Anahita is also known as the goddess of pureness and cleanness in the world. The difference between the original and the official Persian Calendar started with introduction of the Jalali Calendar. In ancient Iran, 12 months had 30 days each and the remaining days of the year (365 or 364) were added to the 12th month. However in Jalali Calendar, the first 6 months (Farvardin, Ordibehesht, Khordad, Tir, Mordad, Shahrivar) have 31 days, the following 5 months (Mehr, Aban, Azar, Day, Bahman) have 30 days and the 12th month (Esfand) has 28 days, or 29 days if it's a leap year. This has become a reason for some confusion. In Iranian visual arts, Anahita is often depicted as a tall and beautiful young lady with long hair pouring down like waves on her shoulders; she's sometimes riding a chariot pulled by 4 white horses each symbolizing rain, snow, hailstone and cloud.According to legendary Iranian history, on Abangan, the Kiani king Zo became victorious over Afrasiab sending the enemy far behind Iranian borders. After Abangan a drought of seven years ended. It's been narrated that Aniranian Afrasiab had destroyed Qanats, Dams and streams and Iranians started rebuilding these resources after he was defeated.Water has always been a sacred element in the Iranian culture since the ancient times and it is mentioned in many sources including Herodotus that Iranian people tried to keep their water resources clean. If the water changed its original taste, color or smell it was no good anymore. Iranians usually celebrate Abangan outdoors near water resources: by the rivers, waterfalls, lakes, etc. After sending prayers, a meal is prepared after which social activities such as games and dances are performed. A great part of such celebrations is reciting Persian poems from Ferdowsi, Hafez and other famous poets. While boys engage in group games such as Haftsang, Alak Dolak, and ball games, girls also entertain themselves with Yeqol-Doqol, Amoo Zanjirbaf or just Khaleh Bazi. The flower symbol of Abangan is supposed to be Niloofar-e Abi (Sardeh) or also known as Egyptian lotus, or Water Lily. Niloofar is plentiful in wetlands of northern Iran. ------------- (Wikipedia) - Abangan refers to the population of Javanese Muslims who practice a more syncretic version of Islam than the more orthodox santri. The term, apparently derived from the Javanese word for red, was first developed by Clifford Geertz but the meaning has since shifted. Abangan are more inclined to follow a local system of beliefs called adat than pure Sharia (Islamic law). Their belief system integrates Hinduism (Wikipedia) - Abangan

    Abangan refers to the population of Javanese Muslims who practice a much more syncretic version of Islam than the more orthodox santri. The term, apparently derived from the Javanese word, abang for red, was first developed by Clifford Geertz but the meaning has since shifted. Abangan are more inclined to follow a local system of beliefs called adat and Kejawen than pure Sharia (Islamic law). Their belief system integrates Hinduism, Buddhism and Animist traditions. However, some scholars hold that what has classically been viewed as Indonesian variance from Islam is often a part of that faith in other countries. For example, Martin van Bruinessen notes similarity between adat and historical practice among Muslims in Egypt as described by Edward Lane.

    Tags:Aban, Abangan, Afrasiab, Anahita, Aniranian, Avesta, Azar, Bahman, Buddhism, Earth, Egypt, Egyptian, Esfand, Farvardin, Ferdowsi, Hafez, Herodotus, Hinduism, Iran, Iranian, Iranian Festivities, Islam, Islamic, Jalali, Khordad, Kiani, Mehr, Mordad, Ordibehesht, Persian, Shahrivar, Sharia, Wikipedia


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